Fizzy milk could soon be on supermarket shelves in a bid to
make the dairy drink ‘cooler’ – and it’s set to be pink.

Dairy company Arla will trial a ‘sparkling fruit and milk
drink’ in the UK, Singapore and the UAE before
being rolled out across the world.

Scientists have come up with the carbonated creation as the
company tries to find ways of making milk more appealing to
teenagers.

It comes after the rising popularity of non dairy milks, such
as nut or soy-based milks.

Milk contains several important nutrients, such as calcium, protein, iodine, potassium, phosphorus and vitamins B2 and B12 - which is why it's perfect for growing children and teenagers

Milk contains several important nutrients, such as calcium,
protein, iodine, potassium, phosphorus and vitamins B2 and
B12 – which is why it’s perfect for growing children and
teenagers

Arla hopes the new fizzy milk drink will help the company,
which is owned by 12,500 farmers, triple the money it currently
makes from milk-based drinks by 2020.

The new creation has been dreamed up by the so-called ‘terrible
twins of innovation’ at Arla: German biochemist Sven
Thormahlen, 60, and Matt Walker, 39, from Harrogate, who
invented the Snap pots for its baked beans.

It is not yet clear when the pink fizzy milk drink will launch
exactly. 

Mr Walker told The Guardian this year: ‘One of the challenges
we have is teenagers not drinking milk.

Plant-based milks are becoming increasingly trendy, with the most popular being almond milk, soy milk, coconut milk and rice milk

Plant-based milks are becoming increasingly trendy, with the
most popular being almond milk, soy milk, coconut milk
and rice milk

‘The insight we’ve found is that milk is not that cool.’

Developer Anne Evers Nikolajsen said the new fizzy milk drink
would be made with a ‘type of whey with no fat’ in an
interview.

‘It contains a certain level of dairy protein and amino acids,
but won’t curdle when mixed with the fruit juice that gives it
its pink colour; it is then carbonated.

‘You could use it in a cocktail in the evening,’ she added.

But fizzy milk hasn’t always been successful in the UK.

Britvic launched the ‘Tango Strange Soda’ in the UK in 2014 but
was withdrawn after less than a year due to poor sales.

In 2009, Coca-Cola trialled Vio carbonated milk drinks in the
US, and they were launched in India last year.

However the fizzy milk drinks never made it to Europe.

According to The Grocer, sales of milk dropped by £240 million
between 2014 and 2016.