An architect who grew up surrounded by sheds splashed out
£245,000 crafting a luxury interpretation of the farm buildings
of his childhood.

Micah Jones and his wife Elaine bought their plot of just over
half an acre of land for £80,000. It housed several old
agricultural buildings, which they demolished using the space
as the footprint of their new home.

The parents to three only budgeted £200,000 for the entire
build, and quickly ran out of money as they forked out for
costs including over £50,000 on  unique timber structure
from Austria – which was transported 2,000 miles to the site on
the back of a truck – and £17,000 for windows.

Micah – who lived in a caravan on the County Down site with his
family during the project – explained to Kevin McCloud on this
week’s Grand Designs that he nicknamed his childhood home
‘Shedland’ and it was this that partly inspired his design.

‘We have to be sophisticated about the design, it is
essentially a big empty shed to live in,’ he said. 

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Architect Micah designed his own very grand interpretation of a shed - a four bedroom home in the footprint of the agricultural buildings he demolished

Architect Micah designed his own very grand interpretation of
a shed – a four bedroom home in the footprint of the
agricultural buildings he demolished

The home was built from timber shipped all the way from Austria on the back of a truck, and the kitchen featured intricate hand-painted tiles lovingly made by his Micah's wife Elaine

The home was built from timber shipped all the way from
Austria on the back of a truck, and the kitchen featured
intricate hand-painted tiles lovingly made by his Micah’s
wife Elaine

Micah crafted the curved walls in the bathroom with a DIY steam bath to bend the panels before applying

Micah crafted the curved walls in the bathroom with a DIY
steam bath to bend the panels before applying

Micah and Elaine set a one year schedule to have their build
completed and achieved that with barely any setbacks.

They tasked their builders with constructing  a concrete
block frame for their home in just 21 days up to the first
floor – a process that would ordinarily take two months – so
that they could drop on the specialist timber frame that was
delivered from Austria.

After ploughing through half of their budget in just the first
three weeks, they stripped back costs and took over most of the
interior and decor work – including the stone cladding –
themselves.

After five months – and with thousands of stones still to
cement – the pressure put began to put the pair to the test.

‘Sometimes when I come down to do the stone work I think it’s
impossible, this is a life’s work as opposed to a few months,’
admitted Micah. 

The couple - who had two sons at the beginning of the project and an extra daughter by the end after Elaine fell pregnant - added bright splashes of colour for their children

The couple – who had two sons at the beginning of the project
and an extra daughter by the end after Elaine fell pregnant –
added bright splashes of colour for their children

The couple bought the 0.6 acre plot of land for £80,000 and decided to knock down the buildings that were on the land

The couple bought the 0.6 acre plot of land for £80,000 and
decided to knock down the buildings that were on the land

The plot of land was made up of several structures that helped inspire Micah's design and recreate an enormous wooden and concrete structure

The plot of land was made up of several structures that
helped inspire Micah’s design and recreate an enormous wooden
and concrete structure

The vast open plan first floor features a kitchen, a study (above) with a rope platform on the ceiling

The vast open plan first floor features a kitchen, a study
(above) with a rope platform on the ceiling

Micah and Elaine Jones, pictured with Grand Designs presenter Kevin McCloud, in their wooden and concrete home

Micah and Elaine Jones, pictured with Grand Designs presenter
Kevin McCloud, in their wooden and concrete home

Inspired by the sheds he grew up around Micah designed a shed-style structure clad in timber and stone from the buildings that were knocked down

Inspired by the sheds he grew up around Micah designed a
shed-style structure clad in timber and stone from the
buildings that were knocked down

The staircase is made of recycled wood to keep costs low

The views from every window are precisely framed by the windows

The staircase is made of recycled wood to keep costs low. The
views from every window are precisely framed by the windows

The sitting room features an interior wall of stone cladding alongside the wood, and a cosy wood burning stove

The sitting room features an interior wall of stone cladding
alongside the wood, and a cosy wood burning stove

The first floor features a polished concrete floor which helps reflect the light from the large end window that also has a balcony

The first floor features a polished concrete floor which
helps reflect the light from the large end window that also
has a balcony

The couple were also forced to secure an extra £25,000 from the
bank to see them to the end of their building project – despite
using recycled wood to keep costs low. 

Tired of living in the caravan that they erected on site, the
couple push to get the property in a state they can move in to.

And nine months after they began, the family – including a
pregnant Elaine – finally swapped their temporary home for
their permanent one in February this year. 

The sprawling structure includes four bedrooms, a nursery for
their latest addition, an enormous open-plan first floor
featuring a kitchen, study and sitting room.  

Grand Designs airs tonight on
Channel 4 at 9pm